Conesy’s Diary: Episode 34 Let’s Get You Started With Airbrushing

My Airbrush Station

I was in a Discord talking with a beginner about airbrushing. They had done their research and were closing in on making that purchase. I shared what advise I could with them. It made me think that I bet there are a number of people out there that could use some advise regarding their first airbrush.

Conesy’s Diary: 11/19/2020

Here’s all of the equipment I use for airbrushing:

I hope to purchase soon, but I don’t recommend for beginners: Iwata Eclipse HP-CS

Go, listen to the show!

Getting Started: Taking Your Hobby Tools to the Next Level

In my original Getting Started: Hobby Tools article I wanted to discuss what I felt were the necessary tools to handle assembly of miniatures that any new hobbyist would need in their collection. That isn’t all of the tools that I use regularly though and as a follow up, I wanted to touch on other tools that I use quite often and why.

Other Commonly Used Tools

Curved Tip Tweezers

One of my most used tools is a is a curved tip tweezers. There are a ton of these out there as tweezers is something that most people have at least a basic tweezers in their bathroom for grooming. However, the curved tip I find is very useful for grabbing small bits, dipping in glue, and then using to attach to a model where my fingers would just be in the way. Maybe it’s just that I am getting older, or maybe I am just getting smarter but I rarely assemble anything that has smaller bits these days without reaching for my tweezers.

Read more

Getting Started: Hobby Tools That You Will Need

So you went out and bought your first model kit and now you need to know what you need to put it together huh? Well, I hope to clear up your confusion with this guide to helping you pick up the right tools so that you can assemble your first models. Once you have those first models assembled, then I will cover some of the additional tools that will help you take your models to the next level.

Read more

Getting Started: Starting Out with Colors

If you have been keeping up, you should now have or be ready to purchase brushes, a palette, and know which vendor(s) paints you want to go with. The next thing to find intimidating is the number of colors in that paint rack. Most manufacturers churn out 40, 50, 60 or more colors and picking which colors you want to get started at a few US dollars for each pot or dropper bottle can stretch your initial hobby funds pretty thin.

In this article, I will go over some strategies you can use in deciding what colors you want to pick up first as you start to put the finishing touches on your starting paint kit. It shouldn’t take a ton of colors to be able to get started with painting. Down the road, as you expand your collection of paints or perfect your abilities to mix the colors you need to help with your growing and continued painting hobby.

Read more

Getting Started: Picking the Right Painting Set Up

So, after a recent conversation at the game store this week with a couple of people I had just run through a demo of Star Wars: Legion by Fantasy Flight Games I realized it might be useful for people just getting into the hobby an idea of what it takes to get started with painting models.

Painting for new wargamers is one of the most intimidating things about miniature wargaming. When I started the game and you would go to the game store where you bought your products there was only one brand of miniature paints that had different colors of paint and hobby inks. Products like washes, mediums, glazes, base colors, highlight colors, air brush paint lines, and all of the other odds and ends just didn’t exist (least not as a something that the average wargamer talked about). Bases were painted Goblin Green and you would put a little model railroad flock on the base after painting your figure (if you even did that) and go on playing with your little toy soldiers.

Now days though, the market has surged with multiple paint lines, hobby products, paint brush manufacturers, and all sorts of things that can make the jump into painting intimidating. In this article, I am going to focus on talking about the accessories to painting like brushes, palettes, and cleaning supplies. In future articles I will talk about what paints and other hobby supplies you might want to pick up.

Paint Brushes

There are a number of brushes out there, but I recommend not going fancy here to start with. While there are a lot of paint brushes on the market and usually available at the game store, there are three sizes of brushes that I recommend you start with. Of course, these sizes are pretty traditional and standardized by artists who have been painting things far longer then we have been painting toy soldiers!

  • A size 2 brush
  • A size 1 brush
  • A size 0 brush

There are a number of other sizes I use or have including an 18/0 and a size 6. All brushes I typically use are round brushes.

Also as a recommendation regarding brushes, don’t go out and buy ridiculously expensive brushes for your first brushes. There’s a lot that goes into brush maintenance and you likely are going to do things that will beat up brushes quickly. On my paint desk are a number of brushes by Artist’s Loft which you can likely find on Amazon or at Michael’s (hobby and craft’s store).

Cleaning Brushes

To start with a simple old heavy cup, like a coffee cup and tap water should be good enough. After working with the paint you are working with just jiggle the brush in the water until the brush seems clean and wipe off with a paper towel. That’s pretty much what I do today and it works fine enough. No need to go any further.

Paint Palette

I strongly recommend you look at getting a paint pallet. Painting directly from the pot or if you go with a paint line that uses dropper bottles. For this, I am going to recommend that you start with a wet palette.

I started out with paint pots and sticking my brush straight into the pots and going to the model. This ends up with a heavy coat of paint that makes it hard to do fine detail painting. Next, I started using glass mirrors (small round ones) or old used CD and DVD ROM disks. These let me do a lot more with mixing different colors up and improved my blends, but the paints dried out so quickly on those that I would often have to remix a color or blend to get the color right. It wasn’t until I went to a wet palette that I really was happy with the palette.

While they aren’t complicated and you can hack one together out of a blister pack, a piece of foam and some wax paper, for about $10 US I picked up a Masterson’s Sta-Wet Handy Palette that’s about 8×6 inches in size. It’s great and I can easily get replacement sponges and paper that are sized and cut for it when I need them. It’s a little extra money here and there for my painting hobby, but the convenience factor for me was worth the few extra dollars a year.